SHAKESPEARE GALLERY

 

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Shakespeare 1 Shakespeare 2 Shakespeare 3 Shakespeare 4 Shakespeare 5
"I feel my heart, newly opened, putting forth tender buds of hope; tomorrow's blossoms."
King Henry VIII
 "Two lovely buds on one stem; so with two friends, one heart."
Midsummer Night's Dream
 "I am that mint... that columbine."
Love's Labours Lost
 "A dinner fit for the gods"
Julius Caesar
 "Haply, I think on thee."
Sonnet 29
         
Shakespeare 6 Shakespeare 7 Shakespeare 8 Shakespeare 9 Shakespeare 10
"Hail to thee, Lady!  And may the grace of heaven enwheel thee round!"
Othello
 "What daisies pied do paint the meadow with delight."
Love's Labours Lost
 "The heavens themselves blaze forth."
Julius Caesar
 "Nothing so becomes a man as modest stillness, humility and peace."
Henry V
 "A dinner fit for the gods."
Julius Caesar
         
Shakespeare 11 Shakespeare 12 Shakespeare 13 Shakespeare 14 Shakespeare 15
"Hail to thee, Lady!  And may the grace of heaven enwheel thee round!"
Othello
 "There are no ancient gentlemen but gardeners, ditchers and grave makers; they hold up Adam's profession."  Hamlet  "So doth the woodbine, the sweet honeysuckle, gentle entwine."
A Midsummer Night's Dream
 "Let me hear from thee, whereso'er thou art in this world's globe, or I'll send an iris that shall find thee out."
King Henry VI
 "The many-colored Iris rounds thine eye."
All's Well That Ends Well
         
Shakespeare 16 Shakespeare 17 Shakespeare 18 Shakespeare 19 Shakespeare 20
"When ladies slippers all silvery dew'd do paint the meadows with delight."
Sonnet 98
 "The lavendere comfortes the brayne very well and one can imbibe good humour from its colour."  Chaucer  "...there are lilies of all kinds blooming in the meadow."
Winter's Tale
 "There are no ancient gentlemen but gardeners, ditchers and grave makers; they hold up Adam's profession."  Hamlet  "Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell..."
A Midsummer Night's Dream
         
Shakespeare 21 Shakespeare 22 Shakespeare 23 Shakespeare 24 Shakespeare 25
"Proud April dressed in all her trim hath put a spirit of youth in everything."
Sonnet 98
 "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet."
Romeo and Juliet
 "...there, where melodious birds sing madrigals, will be make our bed of a thousand fragrant roses."
The Merry Wives of Windsor
 "Th' apparel oft proclaims the man!"  Hamlet "Mercy droppeth as a gentle rain from heaven; an attribute of God Himself."  Shakespeare
         
Shakespeare 26 Shakespeare 27 Shakespeare 28 Shakespeare 29 Shakespeare 30
"Thou, out of heaven's benediction cometh!"  Shakespeare "I feel my heart newly opened putting forth tender buds of hope; tomorrow's blossoms."
Shakespeare
"I, an ass, am onion ey'd."
Shakespeare
"To gild refined gold; to paint the lily is wasteful excess."  Shakespeare "And therewith, fantastic garlands did she make of crowflowers, nettles, orchids, daisies and long purples..."
Shakespeare
         
Shakespeare 31 Shakespeare 32 Shakespeare 33 Shakespeare 34 Shakespeare 35
"There sleeps Titania, some time of the night, lulled in these flowers with dances and delight."
Shakespeare
"There sleeps Titania, some time of the night, lulled in these flowers with dances and delight."
Shakespeare
"There sleeps Titania, some time of the night, lulled in these flowers with dances and delight."
Shakespeare
"A weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in."
Shakespeare
"A very gentle beast and of a good conscience."
Shakespeare
         
Shakespeare 36 Shakespeare 37 Shakespeare 38 Shakespeare 39 Shakespeare 40
"The lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact."
Shakespeare
"The lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact."
Shakespeare
"The fairest flowers o' the season."  Shakespeare "How sweet the moonlight sleeps as we sit upon this bank and let the sounds of music creep into the soft stillness." 
William Shakespeare
"Oh, such a night, when Medea gathered the enchanted herbs that did renew old Aeson."
Shakespeare
         
Shakespeare 41        
       
"Goddess, nymph, perfect divine!  To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?"
Shakespeare
       
         

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